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The Student News Site of Van Nuys High School

The Mirror

The Student News Site of Van Nuys High School

The Mirror

The reason why Gen Alpha is hated by the internet

The children responsible for the Sephora kid pandemic and the iPad kid stereotype have been the talk of social media. Their immature behavior is the root of the problem.
Generation+Alpha+is+becoming+notorious+for+being+chronically+online+and+far+too+trendy.+These+kids+undisciplined+behavior+and+constant+exposure+to+social+media+does+them+no+favors.
THE MIRROR | JERALD CHOONDAKARAN
Generation Alpha is becoming notorious for being chronically online and far too trendy. These kids’ undisciplined behavior and constant exposure to social media does them no favors.

Generation Alpha is quickly superseding Gen Z as the most talked-about age group in recent years. However, its reputation is already being marred by stereotypes based on unusual behaviors never before seen from previous generations.

One of the most infamous stereotypes – talked about heavily on social media platforms like TikTok – is one named “the Sephora kid pandemic.”

All over TikTok and YouTube, adults have been talking about their personal experiences with the Gen Alpha children, mostly girls, whom they call “Sephora kids.” 

This specific group comprises children ranging from seven to roughly 13 years old who are overly obsessed with makeup and skincare products from Sephora that they don’t need.

At a young age, a child’s skin is mostly perfect because they’ve yet to hit puberty. Past generations can atone to the testament that, at Gen Alpha’s current age, they used water as their skincare. 

In addition, many Gen Zers were more focused on playing with the latest doll or building Lego sets rather than trying to purchase the last bottle of serum from their local Sephora.

Drunk Elephant is one of the most popular skincare lines among the Sephora kids. Many of those on social media are claiming that Drunk Elephant’s packaging is only adding fuel to the fire because its packaging appeals mainly to kids with its bright colors and minimalistic look.

The most popular products from this brand are their Retinol Oil and their Bronzi Drops. In spite of the enormous popularity of these two products, however, they are not beneficial in any way to Sephora kids. Retinol, for example, is recommended for those in their mid-20s to early 30s and is mostly used to get rid of wrinkles by increasing collagen, a protein that younger individuals have an abundance of. 

At the same time, these products are also very expensive. Drunk Elephants Retinol Oil retails for $72 and their Bronzi Drops for $38. Prices like these drain parents’ wallets over something completely unnecessary.

Many believe the cause of this Sephora kid pandemic is the Gen Alpha kids’ parents. Junior Teagan Greer says that she believes parents are unable to keep technology out of their kids’ hands. This causes Gen Alpha to become surrounded by, and thus drawn to copy, grown women using makeup on the internet. 

This brings attention to another term used when referring to Gen Alpha kids: “iPad kids.”

“These days when someone’s kid is crying, all parents do is stick an iPad in front of them to make them quiet,” Greer explains.“These kids aren’t disciplined because parents give them whatever they want for them to not bother them and now parents are wondering where it all went wrong and why their children are so ungrateful.”

Many of the students that attend the school have Gen Alpha siblings, who carry trendy items like Stanley cups and can’t go places without filming a TikTok or snapping a post for Instagram, even though the age limit for both platforms is 13 years old.

This has led many students to observe a startlingly high level of entitlement from Gen Alpha, leading some to wonder if the generation can handle the real world maturely.

“These kids have never been said no to and when someone who isn’t their parents finally does say no to them they don’t know how to react and they blow up,” Greer says. “These kids need to be humbled badly before it’s too late or else they’re gonna live the rest of their lives thinking everything can be handed to them.”

@vicky.2087 #sephora #kids #girls #10yearoldgirls #beauty #makeup #mess #disaster #brokenitems #shop #parents!!!!!!!!! #educate #manners ♬ original sound – vicky87

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About the Contributor
Olamide Olumide
Olamide Olumide, News/Features Editor
From writing stories at the back of my elementary school notebooks to my unhealthy obsession with law-themed shows, (especially Lucifer), I've always loved telling and reading stories. As a returning staff member to the Mirror publication, I intend to explore my interest in writing in a more in-depth way as well as reporting stories in a dynamic and interesting perspective. Besides writing and law, I'm an absolute sucker for the kpop industry.
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    TheWeirdDudeMay 18, 2024 at 4:07 pm

    This is so true, kids need discipline, don’t ever throw an ipad at a kid to make them quiet because you don’t know what they’re doing on it.

    Reply