Turn it down! Headphones and hearing loss

A recent study conducted by Lauren K. Dillard and colleagues found that people between the ages of 12 and 34 could be at risk for hearing loss worldwide due to exposure to unsafe listening practices

A recent study conducted by Lauren K. Dillard and colleagues researched how people from ages 12-34 could be at risk for hearing loss worldwide due to exposure to unsafe listening practices.

The study concluded that a significant number of teens could be at risk for hearing loss, tinnitus, or both due to their listening habits.

“It is estimated that 0.67–1.35 billion adolescents and young adults worldwide could be at risk of hearing loss from exposure to unsafe listening practices,” the study stated.

One of the unsafe listening practices discussed in the study was listening to music at high volumes through headphones, a habit that many high school students engage in.

At Van Nuys High School, it’s not difficult to find students with headphones in, blasting music throughout the day. Freshman Hailey Solorzano says she listens to music for at least six hours a day and often has her music set to high volumes.

“Sometimes my phone tells me to turn it down,” Solorzano said, referring to a setting available on Apple devices that sends a notification suggesting users lower the volume when audio is played loudly for an extended period of time.

Despite warnings, it seems that students may not stop blasting music anytime soon. Music is an important part of many young adults’ lives, and many use it to brighten their mood and get through the day. Solorzano concurs, saying, “Listening to music is important to me because it helps me feel better after a long day.”87