By Tyler Jung

The Mirror Staff

“This day was an overall degradation of American morals from both sides of the political spectrum.”

OPINION

The Day America Falls

February 6, 2017

OPINION: Much like his campaign, it was a day of empty promises and inappropriate rhetoric.


America’s 45th president was sworn into the Oval Office on a cloudy day in the District of Columbia on January 20, 2017. Using his own personal Bible and Abraham Lincoln’s Bible from his inauguration in 1861, Donald J. Trump recited the Presidential Oath of Office alongside Chief Justice John Roberts.

Past presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, George Bush, and Barack Obama attended the inauguration on the Capitol building balcony. Trump’s former democratic rival Hillary Clinton also attended, alongside her husband.

“May God help us,” recited Trump, as he lowered his right hand and began to step up to the podium to deliver his inauguration speech to the audience.

Commencing the speech, President Trump expressed gratitude to the American people and the world; he also complimented the Obama administration for a “magnificent” transition of power.

Trump then proceeded to announce that this was not a transfer of power between presidents but a transfer of power to the American people. He then talked about the hoarding of power and wealth among the politicians before his term and expressed his desire to bring it back to the citizens.

President Trump debriefed all his new policies and restated countless times his dedication to the American people. He expressed his displeasure in foreign investments and emphasized his desire to bring back the jobs to the people with his motto — “Buy American, and hire American.”

“Most importantly we will be protected by God,” said Trump as he transitioned from the American people to live out their dreams and the new spirit of America. Using biblical appeals, Trump called forth for a new era of bringing back jobs and fixing the broken systems of welfare, education, and government.

Trump concluded with a calling to patriotism and the rebuilding of America in the new millennium. “When you open your heart to patriotism, there will be no room for prejudice.”

Ending the speech, Trump emphasized his iconic promise, “We will make America Great Again,” followed by an applause from his supporters down below the Capitol Building.

Among the thundering of cannons and applause, President Trump began his way to the Presidential limousine to begin the 58th inauguration parade from the Capitol Building to the White House.

However, Trump’s supporters weren’t the only ones displaying a passionate response.

Protests against Trump’s inauguration ensued outside the streets of Washington D.C throughout the ceremony. Disregarding ex-President Obama’s advice to respect the transition of power, protests escalated as police released flash grenades and tear gas, while rocks and newspapers were thrown back.

As much as the protestors advocated for a peaceful protest, stores were vandalized, fires were started, and Trump supporters were harassed—an overall violent nightmare as people justified their violence as “reforming” their nation.

This day was an overall degradation of American morals from both sides of the political spectrum.

Some Trump supporters viewed his inauguration as permission to perpetuate racism and freely express their prejudiced views to others.

On the other side, protesters also found permission to turn to violence and to ravage the streets of Washington. Some protesters justified their excuse in the violence of the Revolutionary War to change America, but those circumstances are completely different from what we have today.

Both sides of the political spectrum should realize that Trump’s inauguration should not amount into indecent behavior. Trump’s plans, as blatant as they seem, cannot all be passed without the support of the people represented through Congress and the following of the Constitution.

As the leaving president stressed, it is important for America to forge a bridge between their political divide, since at their core, Republicans and Democrats both want the best for America. President Trump is now presented with that chance to make America better for its citizens, and we all have the responsibility to respect his efforts.